The sonic color line race and the cultural politics of listening postmillennial pop. The Sonic Color Line Race And The Cultural Politics Of Listening Postmillennial Pop PDF Book 2019-01-24

The sonic color line race and the cultural politics of listening postmillennial pop Rating: 6,8/10 1950 reviews

The Sonic Color Line: Race and the Cultural Politics of Listening, New Book by Jennifer Stoever

the sonic color line race and the cultural politics of listening postmillennial pop

By amplifying Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield, Charles Chesnutt, The Fisk Jubilee Singers, Ann Petry, W. While attentive to the performance of power—the terrible spectacles of slaveholders' dominion and the innocent amusements designed to abase and pacify the enslaved—and the entanglements of pleasure and terror in these displays of mastery, Hartman also examines the possibilities for resistance, redress and transformation embodied in black performance and everyday practice. This theoretically rich and passionately argued book made me wiser about the social relations that define sound, the resonant events that suggest how the ear is disciplined, the racial politics of listening that extend into every corner of the republic. The unheard history of how race and racism are constructed from sound and maintained through the listening ear. Yet, The Sonic Color Line argues that American ideologies of white supremacy are just as dependent on what we hear voices, musical taste, volume as they are on skin color or hair texture. Yet, even as engineers design robots to be more perfect versions of the human—more rational killers, more efficient workers, and tireless companions—the potential exists to develop alternative modes of engineering and technological development in ways that refuse the racial and colonial logics that maintain social hierarchies and inequality. This notion is indebted in part to excellent scholarship on the gaze, coming from feminism, critical race theory, and also scholarly attention to the senses.

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The Sonic Color Line: Race and the Cultural Politics of Listening, New Book by Jennifer Stoever

the sonic color line race and the cultural politics of listening postmillennial pop

Freedom suits involved those enslaved valets, nurses, and maids who accompanied slaveholders onto free soil. What is the genealogy of this concept? Sensational Flesh uses masochism as a lens to examine how power structures race, gender, and embodiment in different contexts. The Colonizing Trick depicts early America as a white settler colony in the process of becoming an empire--one deeply integrated with Euro-American political economy, imperial ventures in North America and Africa, and pan-American racial formations. Stephen Nathanson, Northeastern University This is an introduction to the philosophy of economic justice. And she wanted to keep her reputation as a kind of a representation of true womanhood, because it was very profitable.

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Reading & Signing with Author Jennifer Stoever

the sonic color line race and the cultural politics of listening postmillennial pop

Reinforcing compelling new ideas about the relationship between race and sound with meticulous historical research, Jennifer Lynn Stoever helps us to better understand how sound and listening not only register the racial politics of our world, but actively produce them. The women share their thoughts about desire and eroticism, black women's sexuality and representation, and ambition and the need to make ends meet. Book Cover: David Oliviera for Camille Norment Studios, Design by Lisa Force. Yet, The Sonic Color Line argues that American ideologies of white supremacy are just as dependent on what we hear-voices, musical taste, volume-as they are on skin color or hair texture. Candidate in Musicology at the University of Pennsylvania.

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PDF Scenes Of Subjection Free Download

the sonic color line race and the cultural politics of listening postmillennial pop

Reinforcing compelling new ideas about the relationship between race and sound with meticulous historical research, Jennifer Lynn Stoever helps us to better understand how sound and listening not only register the racial politics of our world, but actively produce them. In the case of Greenfield, however, I consider the racial surprise as the conditioned response of the listening ear that protects the system. At this point, listening, in some ways, becomes weaponized to reinforce notions of whiteness, and, in this case, matching the white feminine body with a pure sound that emanates from the body. Reinforcing compelling new ideas about the relationship between race and sound with meticulous historical research, Jennifer Lynn Stoever helps us to better understand how sound and listening not only register the racial politics of our world, but actively produce them. It is an ideological mode of listening, propelled by white supremacy, which has been dominant in the U.

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Economic Justice pdf download (by Stephen Nathanson)

the sonic color line race and the cultural politics of listening postmillennial pop

In the process, she radically revises the established historiography of sound studies. You provide accounts of how audiences and critics would strain to match voices and bodies visually and aurally, but also how these same audiences would bifurcate voice from body to rationalize their understanding of race and sound. The family appears ubiquitous in contemporary political discourse in the U. Yet at its core, masochism is a site where power, bodies, and society come together. Through a close look at the eighteenth century's many remarkable documents and artworks, Slavery and the Culture of Taste sets forth the tensions and contradictions entangling a brutal practice and the distinctions of civility. In our contemporary moment, we see how this habitual practice translates into law enforcement, certainly, with perceptions of physicality, including the automatic association between certain racialized sounds and voices with violence.

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The Sonic Color Line : Jennifer Lynn Stoever : 9781479889341

the sonic color line race and the cultural politics of listening postmillennial pop

She was from Sweden, and, as Gus Stadler has discussed in his book , her Nordic identity was key to her success in the U. We still fixate these processes legally and culturally on vision. Rather, the family operates as a powerful signifier through which a constellation of ideologies around race, gender, sexuality, class, and nation are articulated. There is a very richly detailed but unspoken language and perceptual frame for thinking about sound. She is currently working on her second book, Living Room Revolutions, about the record collecting practices of black and Latinx women in the 1960s and 1970s, particularly its importance to self-making in their personal and political lives and its essential role in the birth of hip hop.

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The sonic color line : race and the cultural politics of listening in SearchWorks catalog

the sonic color line race and the cultural politics of listening postmillennial pop

By amplifying Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield, Charles Chesnutt, The Fisk Jubilee Singers, Ann Petry, W. Painstakingly researched and written with verve, Stoever's book will shape the way scholars of American and African American culture and history think about sound, even when our primary texts, like photographs and literary works, are seemingly silent. It seems like, by delineating the ways sonic and listening practices uphold racial divisions, you shift the emphasis of sound studies toward listening. In order to secure their freedom formally, slave attendants or others on their behalf had to bring suit in a court of law. These ears were in a position to shape how the rest of us hear and think, and determine archivally what was preserved and what was discarded. Photo: Jonathan Cohen and Binghamton University. Economic Justice has 14 ratings and 2 reviews.

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The sonic color line : race and the cultural politics of listening in SearchWorks catalog

the sonic color line race and the cultural politics of listening postmillennial pop

In the process, she radically revises the established historiography of sound studies. While these new technologies and engineering projects promise a revolutionary new future, they replicate and reinforce racialized and gendered ideas about devalued work, exploitation, dispossession, and capitalist accumulation. In the process, she radically revises the established historiography of sound studies. Reinforcing compelling new ideas about the relationship between race and sound with meticulous historical research, Jennifer Lynn Stoever helps us to better understand how sound and listening not only register the racial politics of our world, but actively produce them. Once brought into a free jurisdiction, these attendants became informally free, even if they were taken back to a slave jurisdiction—at least according to abolitionists and the enslaved themselves. In the book I try to show examples where sound has radically different meanings and perceptions between racialized peoples, to disrupt this loop and take apart entrenched notions of silence and noise that are deeply embedded with assumptions at the intersection of class, race, and gender. Bold and persuasively argued, Scenes of Subjection will engage readers in a broad range of historical, literary, and cultural studies.

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The Sonic Color Line: Race and the Cultural Politics of Listening, New Book by Jennifer Stoever

the sonic color line race and the cultural politics of listening postmillennial pop

Du Bois, and Lena Horne as agents and theorists of sound, Stoever provides a new perspective on key canonical works in African American literary history. It is the relationship between the sonic and visual that enables racism to continue, morphing and changing, and adapting to each historical moment. I do this by engaging African American speakers and writers who have been discussing the connection between listening and race over the last two hundred years, asking: How can we decolonize? At least that is what conventional wisdom has lead us to believe. She is born on a plantation in Natchez, Mississippi, and subsequently lived in Philly for many years. Du Bois, and Lena Horne as agents and theorists of sound, Stoever provides a new perspective on key canonical works in African American literary history. But to the contrary, Slavery and the Culture of Taste demonstrates that these two areas of modernity were surprisingly entwined.

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