Sympathy and india in british literature 1770 1830 rudd andrew. LIBRIS 2019-02-13

Sympathy and india in british literature 1770 1830 rudd andrew Rating: 5,4/10 1406 reviews

Sympathy and India in British Literature, 1770‐1830. By ANDREW RUDD. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. 2011. 216 p. £50 (hb). ISBN 978‐0‐230‐23339‐3.

sympathy and india in british literature 1770 1830 rudd andrew

My monograph, Sympathy and India in British Literature 1770-1830 Palgrave Macmillan , was published in 2011, and I am currently writin a cultural history of charity in the eighteenth century. Sympathy and India in British Literature, 1770-1830. My research interests lie broadly in eighteenth-century and Romantic period literature, especially Romantic Orientalism and the writings of Sir William Jones and his circle. . Close and insightful readings of texts from Edmund Burke and Sir William Jones to James Mill and Thomas Moore are set in a broad context that productively and convincingly brings into play an array of factors from aesthetics to colonial policy to the demands of the book market.

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Andrew Rudd

sympathy and india in british literature 1770 1830 rudd andrew

He gives detailed examples of how authors such as Campbell, Jones and Burke tried to overcome the difficulty, but in the end the global possibilities of sentiment are blocked by the allure of domesticity and the sinister elements of the exotic. With readings of Eliza Fay, Phebe Gibbes, and Elizabeth Hamilton, amongst others, Rudd describes a distinctive colonial sympathy that binds exiled Britons together while effectively excluding Indians. Depicting Hinduism as monstrous and primitive, these authors sought to elicit sympathy for Indians who were cast as the victims of tyrannical Brahmins, rather than those of British imperialists. This study of colonial affect will be essential reading for all scholars of Romantic orientalism. Unlike the successful Oriental writing of Moore and Byron, Rudd contends that Southey's poem is a generic failure because it does not sympathetically interest the audience by blending Oriental tropes with Western sentiment.

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axtia-technologies.com: Sympathy and India in British Literature, 1770

sympathy and india in british literature 1770 1830 rudd andrew

India was the object of intense sympathetic concern during the Romantic period. His book investigates the aesthetic and ethical problems caused by the failure of the sympathetic imagination, as well as the evolution of the strategies of representation through which India was brought before the British public. I have additional interests in the popular print culture and visual arts of the eighteenth century and Romantic period, as well as the poetry of Robert Bloomfield,and, turning to more recent times, the writings of Frederick Rolfe, Evelyn Waugh, Francis Yeats Brown and Bruce Chatwin. My work explores the influence of writers and thinkers associated with the Scottish Enlightenment on British Romanticism as a whole and in particular in relation to expressive poetry. An enlightening and rewarding read. Sympathy and India in British Literature, 1770-1830. I specialise in eighteenth-century and Romantic period literature and am the author of Sympathy and India in British Literature 1770-1830 Palgrave Macmillan.

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LIBRIS

sympathy and india in british literature 1770 1830 rudd andrew

My monograph, Sympathy and India in British Literature, 1770-1830, published in the Palgrave Studies in the Enlightenment, Romanticism and the Cultures of Print series in 2011, explores writing on India specifically in the context of imaginative sympathy and its power to facilitate, and indeed complicate and subvert, imaginative transactions between different peoples and cultures. Andrew Rudd argues that distance in space is likewise a serious impediment to sympathy, and that even the most active imagination is thwarted in its efforts to compassionate misery and injustice inflicted far away in South Asia. Nigel Leask London: Everyman, 1997 , p. Rudd provides a framework for his understanding of sympathy based on the moral philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment. Chapter 4 advances how evangelical authors and missionaries reimagine sympathy as Gothic affect.

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Sympathy and India in British Literature, 1770‐1830. By ANDREW RUDD. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. 2011. 216 p. £50 (hb). ISBN 978‐0‐230‐23339‐3.

sympathy and india in british literature 1770 1830 rudd andrew

He gives detailed examples of how authors such as Campbell, Jones and Burke tried to overcome the difficulty, but in the end the global possibilities of sentiment are blocked by the allure of domesticity and the sinister elements of the exotic. O presente artigo analisa a representação da Goa católica dois anos após o final da administração colonial portuguesa quando o futuro político do território era ainda uma incógnita através dos topoi da singularidade da Goa católica e higiénica face a uma Índia ameaçadora, suja e doente poética da sujidade , metáforas que eram, há muito tempo, recorrentes na literatura inglesa. Martyn, Henry Martyn 1781—1812 : Scholar and Missionary to India and Persia Lewiston: Edwin Mellen Press, 1999. Palgrave Studies in the Enlightenment, Romanticism and Cultures of Print. Sympathy and India in British Literature, 1770-1830. Rudd rounds out his survey with a discussion of how James Mill's and Friedrich von Schlegel's engagements with ancient Indian history and culture shaped European perceptions of India, as well as how William Wordsworth's rural devotion seeks to counter the exotic imports of Oriental fiction.

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Sympathy and India in British Literature, 1770

sympathy and india in british literature 1770 1830 rudd andrew

Europeans sought to preserve their national identity and subjectivity by setting their own normative sensibility against the dangers of the Indian climate. Copyright information Cite this chapter as: Rudd A. Hindu beliefs, ceremonies and rites were construed in new ways that may be characterised as gothic. Through analyses of Robert Southey's The Curse of Kehama, Sydney Owenson's The Missionary, and Charles Maturin's Melmoth the Wanderer, Rudd establishes how anxiety about the pernicious influence of Hinduism revives the Gothic form as it was passing out of fashion, providing it with a new target to follow in the chiaroscuro shadows of Catholicism and Jacobinism. Rudd suggests that Jones and Burke rely equally on the power of sympathy to ensure imaginative engagement. But what was the true nature of imaginative engagement with British India? Sympathy and India in British Literature is a compelling contribution to a growing body of scholarship that explores the complex networks of affective global politics in the Romantic period.

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Andrew Rudd

sympathy and india in british literature 1770 1830 rudd andrew

In his third chapter, Rudd proposes that a new notion of sensibility emerged from writers in Bengal at the end of the eighteenth century to adapt to life in the colonial contact zone. Andrew Rudd argues that distance in space is likewise a serious impediment to sympathy, and that even the most active imagination is thwarted in its efforts to compassionate misery and injustice inflicted far away in South Asia. But what was the true nature of imaginative engagement with British India? Chapter 2 moves from London to Calcutta to consider how, like Burke, Sir William Jones and the Asiatic Society attempted to assimilate India into the British imagination, this time by reconfiguring Orientalism as a cosmopolitan and neoclassical aesthetic that could inspire transnational bonds. Such Gothic depictions of Hinduism overturned the sympathetic curiosity that marked the close of the previous century, modulating Britain's relationship to India in the tone of moral superiority that would inform the imperialist discourse of the nineteenth century. Rudd begins the chapter with an overview of contemporary opinions on Oriental literature to contextualize his comparison of the critical reception of Robert Southey's Curse of Kehama and Thomas Moore's Lalla Rookh--considered by contemporaries as poor and strong examples of Orientalist writing, respectively. These comments were published in the Courier, 29 August and 7, 9—11 September 1816; see Charles I. Corresponding to this, I am interested in theories of imaginative sympathy, emotion and affect as they manifest themselves in the literature of the period.

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Gothic Sympathy and Missionary Writing

sympathy and india in british literature 1770 1830 rudd andrew

Moving chronologically through a range of texts, Rudd traces a familiar narrative of British imperialism in India--from the syncretic Orientalism associated with figures such as Sir William Jones and Warren Hastings in the last decades of the eighteenth century, to the influence of evangelical missionaries and the rigid Anglicanism of James Mill and Thomas Macaulay into the nineteenth century. The failure of the sympathetic imagination was ultimately the result of the collusion of the commercial pressures of the book trade and the colonial project, dictating at once aesthetic tastes, political power, and moral imperatives. For a consideration of anti-Catholicism after 1800, see Susan M. In: Sympathy and India in British Literature, 1770—1830. In the course of its consideration of Burke, the chapter gives a comprehensive social and cultural portrait of Burke's milieu, presenting writers and texts ranging from contemporary literary representations of the nabob to satirical prints, philosophical discourse, parliamentary speeches, and trial commentaries.

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Gothic Sympathy and Missionary Writing

sympathy and india in british literature 1770 1830 rudd andrew

An enlightening and rewarding read. Sympathy and India in British Literature, 1770-1830 begins with the failure of imaginative sympathy. Echoing Hume's skeptical claim that imaginative sympathy meets its affective limit at the national border, Rudd contends that the British were fundamentally incapable of meaningfully engaging with India due to its geographic remoteness and cultural otherness. Rudd reasons that his study resists casting moral judgment on Orientalist representations of the East, and if there is a latent critical tension in the book, it lies perhaps in the task of locating a comfortable position between rigorous postcolonial critique and a sympathetic appreciation of Romantic efforts to encounter India within a fundamentally inequitable system. Exploring the intersection of aesthetic, cultural, philosophical, and political discourses that marked this transformative period, Rudd makes persuasive connections between British literary culture and the colonial project in India. Close and insightful readings of texts from Edmund Burke and Sir William Jones to James Mill and Thomas Moore are set in a broad context that productively and convincingly brings into play an array of factors from aesthetics to colonial policy to the demands of the book market.

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