Dissident knowledge in higher education. Book review / Dissident knowledge in higher education 2019-01-27

Dissident knowledge in higher education Rating: 7,8/10 1268 reviews

Dissident Knowledge in Higher Education

dissident knowledge in higher education

Perhaps this could be achieved through the rejection of austerity and accountability, and a focus on strengthening the democratic community for all as a university function. Something more to the touch than visibility. Lincoln, Norman Denzin, and Peter McLaren who offers the afterword are among them. Paying attention to the structure of any book of this nature, the ways in which Lincoln lays out the battleground on which the text is going to stake its claim is particularly important. Yet, just as these enticing possibilities invite us to expand our research in ways unimagined just a decade ago, a parallel counterbalancing shift towards a ubiquitous neoliberal and accountability-focused culture — both in the academy and in society — imperils these promising developments. Those of us who have been able to eat the apple, especially those who are white and tenured, as Grande points out, contribute to settler colonialism in the form of individualized accumulation and accompanying processes of auditing within the academy.

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Dissident knowledge in higher education

dissident knowledge in higher education

I'd just like to thank Martin McQuillan for flagging up what looks like a much needed and interesting book that I hadnt heard about and now have got hold of. Marc Spooner is a professor in the Faculty of Education at the University of Regina. Image Credit: Neoliberalism also diminishes the authority of local governments and hinders the shaping of social interests. They offer rhetorical, rosy soundbites about accountability, legitimacy, and responsiveness that disguise neoliberal logics and perpetuate settler colonialism through the academy. The contributors to this volume identify a number of plagues in contemporary higher education, some of them imagined, some of them parochial to the Canadian context, but others that chime with the wider currents of universities in the globalised West. What is the cost of the triumph of the mercantilist university? We are committed to ensuring that your privacy is protected.

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Bonus Vita: Dissident Knowledge in Higher Education: Marc Spooner and James McNinch write about their new edited book (2018)

dissident knowledge in higher education

It is even more remarkable how few ever try to find out. Unfortunately, the potential of organized academic labour as a vehicle for seizing back? About the editors: is a professor in the Faculty of Education at the University of Regina. The book is a result of the 2015 symposium that preceded it. Widely recognised as an expert on homelessness, Spooner has been the principal investigator for several research studies funded by federal and municipal governments, including a series of assessments of the ongoing Regina Community Plan, which gave particular attention to the perspectives of homeless service providers and First Nations service users. Perhaps the most impressive aspect of the book, aside from being an attempt to light a fire under our collective posteriors against managerialism and audit culture in academia, is the connection made by Indigenous contributors that neoliberalism is fundamentally about settler colonialism. Making change may demand that we abandon familiar strategies and move beyond comfortable arenas and alliances.

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Review: Dissident Knowledge

dissident knowledge in higher education

All of the contributors would argue that, in effect, the academy has been taken from us and it is time to rescue it from siege and ongoing crisis. But bean counting is only the beginning, as the contributors collectively argue in the 2018 collection, Dissident Knowledge in Higher Education, edited by Marc Spooner and James McNinch. Lincoln, and others delve into the effects of colonialism, neoliberalism, and audit culture on higher education. It reaches anyone who wants to understand the social, political, and economic trends that define our times. Something more material than raising consciousness.

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Book Review: Dissident Knowledge in Higher Education edited by Marc Spooner and James McNinch

dissident knowledge in higher education

According to Tuhiwai Smith, certain research gets legitimized and valued through administrative practices of colonialism; other research does not, or at least, not as readily. He sheds lights on the suffering of university staff facing endless accountability, data, value-added measures of success and form-filling. You, the reader, are now an integral part of this gathering and will help shape the future as you engage with these and other texts and groups. If we were to use the term correctly, it would mean a university where each of its functions was put out to tender to private companies that would run them according to the principles of market efficiency, while achieving a profit for their shareholders. The book comprises 13 independent chapters in total, with contributions by experts who have written on aspects of higher education. Should we ask you to provide certain information by which you can be identified when using this website, then you can be assured that it will only be used in accordance with this privacy statement.

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Dissident Knowledge in Higher Education

dissident knowledge in higher education

Overall, however, Dissident Knowledge in Higher Education is recommended as a good read for scholars, policymakers and practitioners, and it may also be a worthy text for undergraduate students too. We should spend a little time unpicking that. The problems highlighted in Dissident Knowledge might not even be easily recognized by many as problems, in the first place. Of course, being eligible for promotion connotes being lucky enough to have a position in which promotion is possible in the first place, which excludes the growing legions of adjunct instructors who are not offered job security or benefits. Registration is free and only takes a moment.

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Book Review: Dissident Knowledge in Higher Education edited by Marc Spooner and James McNinch

dissident knowledge in higher education

Dissident Knowledge in Higher Education. With contributions from Noam Chomsky, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Eve Tuck, Joel Westheimer, and others, this book examines the impact of the corporatization of higher education and offers a better way forward. In no less than three instances on the cover, spine, and back cover, readers are presented with the image of a rotting apple core. Chapter after chapter, the arguments of the book are tied to what it repeatedly calls the neoliberal university. It is not easy to have a perfect record on every progressive cause, but if you cannot recognise a real authoritarian regime actively curtailing academic freedom when it happens under your nose, what is the point of being a dissenter? It is a pity, then, that such little attention is given to the specifics of each problem, which all have different causes and affect individuals in distinct ways. James McNinch is an emeritus professor and the former dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Regina.

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Dissident Knowledge in Higher Education: Marc Spooner and James McNinch write about their new edited book

dissident knowledge in higher education

It is much more difficult to acquire a knowledge of higher education policy and use it to manage real institutions with their complex demands. There is certainly a lot of that in the academy, particularly evident as one goes up for promotion. The text, entitled , Dissident Knowledge in Higher Education , is not one to be taken lightly, even at first glance. As audit culture and governmentality spread, they give rise to a new managerialism set on measuring us against rigid conceptions of research and impact, regardless of how inappropriate, unethical, or deleterious such constricting measures may be to ourselves and our communities. What would a neoliberal university look like? She argues that this refusal would not cause the university to disappear; rather, it would contribute politically to its reform. And Marie Battiste challenges any temptation to Canadian smugness with an account of how often Indigenization projects reflect attempts to increase academic market share and fail to recognize Indi­ge­nous diversity, treaty rights and the im­plications of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission recommendations. It is not possible to comment on the quality of management decisions at any given university without knowing the context and constraints under which they are made, but I am reasonably confident in saying that few are the result of the organising principles of neoliberalism.

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